The legacy of Sydney Loofe, a Lincoln woman who was found dead last December, will be remembered through an academic scholarship distributed by  a nonprofit organization called the Set Me Free Project. 

“We wanted Sydney’s legacy to be not of tragedy but of helping others,” Stephanie Olson,  of Omaha, and president of the organization, said. 

The idea for the scholarship was brought forward by a student attending Neligh-Oakdale High School, where Loofe’s dad George is the principal. 

The Set Me Free project, aiming to prevent human trafficking and increase cyber safety, asked if it could provide the scholarship in Loofe’s honor, and her parents agreed. 

“I think that by focusing on Sydney, this means quite a bit (to her parents), even if it’s a small difference,” Olson said. 

The scholarship, totaling $3,000, will be available to a Nebraska high school graduate who has a 3.0 GPA and plans to major in criminal justice, cyber safety or social work. Donations to the nonprofit where gathered to raise the $3,000. 

“We want to see somebody passionate about community safety and someone who wants to make a difference,” Olson said. 

The Set Me Free project is planning to award the Sydney Loofe scholarship in May 2019, although the exact date has yet to be determined. 

For more information about the Set Me Free project or to apply for the Sydney Loofe scholarship, visit setmefreeproject.net./scholarship. 

“I definitely think Sydney would love it. I think she would be surprised, but she would love it,” Olson said. 

hope@sewardindependent.com

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